Honors Program

Quality Indicators

Honors Program Mission

The mission of the Honors Program at Washburn University is to provide highly motivated and academically talented students with enriched educational experiences in and out of the classroom, enabling and empowering them to realize their full potential as critical thinkers, informed global citizens, and agents of change. Toward this end, the program provides curricular and co-curricular experiences supporting, promoting, and rewarding excellence in academic rigor, research and scholarship, leadership, and service learning.

Honors Advisory Board

Fall 2017 - Spring 2018

Name

Department

Subcommittee or Role(s)

Term

Christa Bixler

Admissions

Scholarship...

2017-

Mindy Rendon

Residential Living

Scholarship...

2017-

Debbie Isaacson

School of Nursing

Curriculum...

2014-2016

Dmitri Nizovtsev

General Education Representative

N/A

Joel Bluml

Student Life

Scholarship...

2017-

Jack Williamson

Honors Student Council, President

2017-

Jean Sanchez

School of Applied Studies

Curriculum...

2016-2018

Jennifer Ball

School of Business, Faculty Senate Representative

Curriculum...

2016-2018

Jennifer Jenkins

Academic Success

Scholarship...

N/A

John Burns

Education/Kinesiology

Curriculum...

2015-2017

Bayley Baker

WSGA representative

2017-

Kelly Erby

Social Sciences

Curriculum...

2015-2017

Martha Placeras

Creative and Performing Arts

Curriculum...

2016-2018

Matthew Cook

Natural Science and Mathematics

Curriculum...

2016-2018

Jennifer McGraw

Financial Aid

Scholarship...

2017-

David Ober

Leadership Institute

Scholarship...

2017-

Kerry Wynn

University Honors Dean (Chair)

N/A

Steve Hageman

Mabee Library

Scholarship...

2017-

Geoff Way

Humanities

Curriculum...

2017-

Student Learning Outcomes

Honors courses that fulfill General Education requirements meet several Student Learning Outcomes, which are based on the University Student Learning Outcomes.  These goals and the rubrics used to assess them are linked below:

HN 200-level Courses will teach students to:

  • Evaluate written, oral (and/or visual information), evidence, and argument for reliability and authority (and/or usefulness). Examples of sources listed include but are not necessarily limited to the following: observation, testimony, measurement, and experimental research.
  • Analyze own and other’s assumptions systematically and methodically, and evaluate relevance of contexts when presenting a position.
  • Develop well-supported, clearly articulated argument(s) to support a stance and use to justify one or more conclusions.

For additional information, please visit our Student Learning Outcomes assessment rubrics for HN 201 (Humanities), HN 202 (Social Sciences), and HN 203 (Natural Sciences).

HN 300-level Courses will teach students to:

  • Develop a coherent body of evidence, sufficient to support an argument, through the evaluation of an array of sources for meaning, relevance, and reliability.
  • Formulate a specific position (perspective, thesis/hypothesis) that accounts for the complexities of the issue and weighs the positions taken by others.
  • Create organized, well-supported, clearly articulated argument(s) to construct a stance and use to justify one or more conclusions.

For additional information, please visit our Student Learning Outcomes assessment rubrics for HN 301 (Humanities), HN 302 (Social Sciences), and HN 303 (Natural Sciences).