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The Lincoln Lecture

The Lincoln Harman Lecture will be Thursday, Feb. 5 at 7 p.m. in the Washburn Room on the main level of the Memorial Union.

The Lincoln Harman Lecture is one of several special events instituted in anticipation of Washburn University’s sesquicentennial celebration in 2015. It is free and open to the public.

Washburn was established as Lincoln College by a charter issued by the State of Kansas and the General Association of Congregational Ministers and Churches of Kansas on Feb. 6, 1865.

Learn more about Steven Hahn, presenter of the 2015 Lincoln Harman Lecture

Steven HahnWashburn University presents the twenty-seventh Lincoln Harman Lecture, by Steven Hahn, “What Slaves Thought of Lincoln.”

Steven Hahn serves as the Roy R. and Jeannette P. Nichols Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University and is a specialist on the history of nineteenth-century America, African-American history, the history of the American South, and the international history of slavery and emancipation.  He is the author of A Nation Under Their Feet: Black Political Struggles from Slavery to the Great Migration, winner of a Pulitzer Prize, and The Roots of Southern Populism: Yeoman Farmers and the Transformation of the Georgia Upcountry, which received both the Allan Nevins Prize and the Society of American Historians and the Fredrick Jackson Turner Award of the Organization of American Historians.

“We are honored to have Professor Hahn on our campus. He is a dynamic and engaging speaker. I am certain that his unique insights and fascinating stories will deepen our understanding of and appreciation for Abraham Lincoln,” said Bruce Mactavish, assistant professor of history and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, who serves on the planning committee for the lecture series.

The Lincoln Harman Lecture Series is in its 27th year at Washburn University. Its purpose is to “encourage individual and public interest in the ideals and integrity exemplified in the life of Abraham Lincoln,” as stated by Judge Jerome Harman, a 1935 graduate of the Washburn School of Law, when he and his wife created the lecture fund. The lecture has recently been presented in conjunction with events celebrating Washburn University’s sesquicentennial. Washburn was established as Lincoln College by a charter issued by the State of Kansas and the General Association of Congregational Ministers and Churches of Kansas on Feb. 6, 1865.

Previous Lincoln Lectures

2014 - John Stauffer, professor of English and of African and African American Studies and Chair of the History of American Civilization Program at Harvard, presented "GIANTS: The Parallel Lives of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass."

Lincoln Lecture demonstrates power of reading, speaking well

2013 - Manisha Sinha, professor of Afro-American studies at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, presented "Race and Equality in the Age of Lincoln."

Washburn true to abolitionist roots after 148 years

2012 - Richard Norton Smith, presidential historian, presented “Lincoln and Washburn University: Toward a New America.”